A review of Our January Meeting

 A Review January 2017 Meeting: Mosaics with George Lavaroto by Liz Kennedy  George introduced us to the wonderful world of mosaics. Mosaics date back 4000 years.  Mosaics are made from […]

 A Review January 2017 Meeting: Mosaics with George Lavaroto
by Liz Kennedy 

Our speaker

George introduced us to the wonderful world of mosaics. Mosaics date back 4000 years.  Mosaics are made from materials such as: natural stone, enamel, river rock, shells or broken rock.

Small modern mosaics are often done on a vinyl background, larger ones on a ¾” board.  You must consider what you going to use for glue. George suggested Wellbond. Is it made to fit tightly or will it be grouted? Historically broken rock was used but today we use tiles.

Roman England

George showed us photos of mosaics from a house built in Roman England. Another of a several thousand year old Egret mosaic where all the tiles were the same size with sectioned off pieces of stone creating the picture.

The Romans did mosaics of things in their environment as well as using mythological creatures or combinations of creatures to create entirely new animals.

Historically hiring artists to do mosaics was a way to spread the wealth around. Many were financed by wealthy families like the Medici family. Also some were commissioned by the church. Religious mosaics were found throughout the Roman Empire. Different areas used different techniques to create their mosaics.

Commeso is a very complex form of mosaic developed in northern Italy at the turn of the 14th century when the Renaissance was just beginning. These mosaics are very detailed and took

Commesco

incredible amounts of time and money. The Medici family had money and promoted public displays of culture and art. The photo of the Rose Trellis shows the individually cut and shaped pieces using different colours to create leaves, flowers and stems. It is like making puzzles out of rock. The joints are so close they are seamless. It looks like a painting. Fernando III opened the Study of Stone Facility to provide info to the artists. It was found if the stones were cut at a 15° angle the fitter had room to play and the joints were still almost seamless.

In the 20th and 21st century mosaics have become popular for use in bathrooms, kitchens, floors and for designs in landscaping gardens. Some pebble mosaics can be flat but look 3D based on the pebble size and colour.

Thank you George for a great presentation and we wish you the best of luck with your own mosaic projects.

featured image is a mosaic floor of a Roman Bath, Bath ~Wikipedia; pictures are from George Lavorato’s presentation, photographed by Chris Robart

Plans are underway for a workshop on Mosaics. Hopefully the workshop will take place sometime in tye spring. Workshops are open to members of the Gem and mineral Club of Scarborough only. However you may wish to join our club and participate. For more information on workshops, please contact our Workshop Coordinator Kim