A Review Of Our November Meeting

   A Review of November  Our 2017 Meeting:The King of Tides, Minerals of the Bay of Fundy Nova Scotia Written by Liz Kennedy On November 1st we were treated to […]

 

 A Review of November  Our 2017 Meeting:The King of Tides, Minerals of the Bay of Fundy Nova Scotia

Ray McDougall

Written by Liz Kennedy

On November 1st we were treated to an excellent presentation by Raymond McDougall. The Bay of Fundy has been one of Canada’s greatest known mineral producers since the 1830’s. The last 25 years have produced some of the finest quality and diverse specimens. These specimens quickly make their way into the hands of collectors so they are not as widely known as they might be. It is best known for its zeolites and associated minerals. The cliffs and shorelines are continually being renewed from weathering so every visit provides the possibility for new specimens. Great specimens are not common and it takes work and perseverance to find them. The water looks gentle from the cliffs but it is very powerful. Fourteen cubic kilometres of water move with every tide change.  As well freezing, thawing and ice expose and destroy specimens.

The main collecting areas are:

  • Wasson’s Bluff is where Chabazite, Natrolite, Stilbite (a different colour than normal) and other minerals can be collected. There is a rope down the bluff to the beach.
  • Cape Blomidon – Amethyst Cove and Cape Split.

    Chabazite Wasson’s Bluff

    Here the main minerals are Analcine, Quartz (amethyst variety), Tomsonite and Apophyllite. The water conditions here are too unpredictable to use a water route for collecting. Access is over the vertical cliffs and down.

  • Cape D’Or is where native Copper, Thomsonite, Mesolite, Apophyllite and other minerals can be found. The native copper is found in tree like formations which are hard to excavate as well as cubes and twinned crystals. Copper was mined here in the 1900’s at Colonial mine. It was closed five years later. There are very powerful waves due to the bottom conditions causing the D’Or rift current to be very dangerous. In addition it is very tough walking.

    Copper Cape D’Or

  • Two Islands and Five Islands are where Gmelenite is found. Two Islands has lots of rock fall and you need a hard hat. To get to Five Islands a boat is required. Most of the Gmelinite at Pinnacle Rock is gone but you can still find Natrolite sprays.

The Bay of Fundy is a challenging place to collect. There is no collecting in winter. The tides, wind, waves and weather make it additionally dangerous the rest of the year. Remember if you decide to go, you need accurate information on the tides. Check out the rock shop in Parrsboro for more information.

 

We thank Raymond for his interesting presentation and beautiful photographs and wish him successful collecting in the future.